Sunday, July 09, 2006

Oxford dictionary updated for Web

LONDON, England -- The Internet version of one of the world's oldest dictionaries has been updated for the 21st century to include hundreds of new words.
More than 10,000 new entries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary Online ( since March 2000.
The dictionary also unveils a new search engine, making it possible to track down a number of specifically related words such as all the words of Japanese origin which entered the English language in the 16th century.
Users can also now perform case-sensitive searches or track down accented and other special characters by using a new advanced search page.
New additions include the Japanese term "karoshi" meaning "death brought on by overwork or job-related exhaustion."
Fortunately, A comes before K and so anyone feeling the karoshi should find the alternative therapy Ayurveda first -- a word which makes an appearance along with related terms "dosha," "kapha," "vata" and "pitta."
New technology expands its presence in the dictionary with entries ranging from "ethernet" to "hot-link," which means "a link between documents or applications which enables data from one source to be incorporated into another."
But be careful, as it can also be a "spicy sausage."
The updated OED Online also defines "high street" used as an adjective to mean "popular or mainstream."
"Feeding frenzy," "decaf," "Dolcelatte," "haircare" and "frizzy" are also among the new wave of words.
Changing lifestyles
"Girl Power," which was promoted in the UK by the all-girl pop group the Spice Girls, is defined as "a self-reliant attitude among girls and young women manifested in ambition, assertiveness and individualism."
Another new word in the seventh quarterly update of the OED Online site is "comper" -- defined as "a person who habitually enters competitions in order to win as many prizes as possible."
The practice of this art is comping.
New phrases indicating our changing lifestyles are "home cinema" and "home shopping."
Other new entries include "ecofeminism," "ecotourism" and "detangler."
And if all this is too much, perhaps you'll want a "microbrewery," defined as "a brewery which produces limited quantities of beer, often for consumption locally or on its own premises."
It is one of a series of new technical and scientific terms in the dictionary prefixed with "micro-" or "meta-."

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